Quotes about intimidating others

Friends took great care of us and we were extremely lucky.

In fact, I had some of the most rich and enjoyable experiences that I’ve had in years (limited access to technology tends to do that! However, the devastation from this storm, like all natural disasters in recent years, has left tens of thousands of people homeless.

In the West Village we were without power, cell service and heat all week, but things got back on track over the weekend.

I’m deeply grateful to be safe and for your notes of love and concern via email, Twitter and Facebook.

Click on the "About" link on the main menu bar to get the full scoop on my story.

First up, THANK YOU for your incredible support last week during Hurricane Sandy.

None of the above can happen as long as we continue to listen to the wimpy voice that’s inside of all of us, saying that Hi, my name is Shola and I'm the founder of The Positivity Solution.

That’s why I talk about the dangers of living a fear-controlled life so often on this blog (like here, here and here for starters.)While that’s true, there’s one form of fear that I haven’t really addressed up until this point, and it actually might be the most common form of fear that exists. Or more specifically, Before I dive in, a quick disclaimer–I’m not a psychiatrist (obviously), so if you have a legitimate full-blown phobia of other people, then this blog post definitely isn’t for you.

The key is to remember (and believe) this: When you walk into the same room with them, Unfortunately, there are some less-than-positive characters out there who actually enjoy intimidating other people.

Case in point: A couple of years ago, I was asked to give a class to a group of “interpersonally challenged” physicians on how to effectively communicate with their nursing staff. Let’s just say that I wasn’t warmly received when I walked into the room.

Not only were they intent on intimidating me, they were intent on making sure that I knew with every fiber of my being that I didn’t belong in the same room as them. Instead, during that class, I focused myself fully on delivering the information in the best way that I could.

I’d be lying if I said that it wasn’t an absolutely miserable two hours (because it was), but they epically failed in their attempt to intimidate me. It was easy to keep pushing past their rudeness and hostility because I know that my class has value (thousands of people who went through my classes before them seemed to think so.) I know that there is value in my message of communicating with respect and kindness in the workplace (even if they clearly didn’t.) Most of all, I know that I have value as a trainer and a person. Sadly, there are many people in this world who get their jollies from intimidating other people.

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